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Validating Post-Traumatic Fibromyalgia 2 ~ The Connection Between Abuse & FMS Development

Is there a valid correlation between abuse, and the development of Fibromyalgia?

In ‘ Validating Post-Traumatic Fibromyalgia 2 ‘, I will explore the evidence for the connection between the onset of Fibromyalgia and past abuse in  FMS patients. As with my first post in this series, ‘Validating Post-Traumatic Fibromyalgia ~ The Connection Between Physical Trauma and FMS’, there are certain commonalities found among those who develop FMS.  One of these found in many FMS patients, is a past history of abuse.

There seem to be several reasons, although none agreed upon in the medical community, for why a person becomes susceptible to Fibromyalgia. As I have stated it has been traced back to; physical trauma, war experience, sexual abuse, abandonment, latent viruses, PTSD, ect. And, as I have stated before, the common element among all of these varied subjects is the undo stress they put on the Central Nervous System.

Stress that fails to get alleviated causes damage to the mind, which in turn wrecks havoc on the body. A study on the impact of toxic stress on communities and individuals, shows a link between many diseases (Fibromyalgia and CFS being among them) and stress.

Stress that fails to get alleviated causes damage to the mind, wrecks havoc on the body... Click To Tweet

There are many suspected reasons for the onset of Fibromyalgia. Emotional trauma, especially forms of abuse, can clearly be seen as one of these reasons. Abuse that causes toxic levels of stress occur not only in childhood, but can be suffered as an adult too; spousal abuse, rape, psychological abuse, toxic relationships, ect. All of these cause extreme forms of pressure, and stress on the mind that seem to manifest as disease within the body.

Validating Post-Traumatic Fibromyalgia 2

 Three kinds of stress:

  1. Good Stress ~ As a child, a person experiences stress when meeting new people, attending the first day of school, riding a bike for the first time, ect. If good ‘child care’ (parent/caregivers) is available, the child learns how to handle and overcome these stresses. This helps to develop healthy coping skills later in life as stressful situations continue to occur.

  2. Tolerable Stress ~ These are negative experiences such as the death of a parent, a natural disaster, a minor car accident, ect. Again, with healthy parenting and/or healthy caregivers the child, although severely impacted, does not stay in a state of stress for longer than necessary. They will also learn healthy coping skills here to help deal with, and overcome the event.

  3. Toxic Stress ~ This occurs in environments of abuse and neglect. Here a child faces situations of severity that are far beyond their ability to cope. Here is where the ‘fight of flight’ survival response begins, and stays in a state of ‘switched on’. This is where life long poor health, habits, and addictions can develop, and chronic pain. The brain was never meant to be in this state for a prolonged period of time, and as a result the body & mind can become ‘toxic’.

 

Validating Post-Traumatic Fibromyalgia 2 ~ The Connection Between Abuse & FMS Development

Human bodies were not created to withstand intense and prolonged levels of 'fight or flight'… Click To Tweet

The case for validating post-traumatic fibromyalgia in relation to its development as a result of abuse seems to be fairly clear. Human bodies were not created to withstand intense and prolonged levels of the ‘fight or flight’ response.

This is yet another reason why I believe in a holistic approach to the treatment of FMS. The whole body needs attention in the healing process, especially the most complex organ we possess; the mind.

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13 Comments

  • Reply
    Nikki
    June 14 at 6:21 am

    Kristine, I so agree with your assessment. Stress can be a killer. My AI disease was brought on by the stress of my son’s addiction and all the things that came with it. My body held out for months, as I fought to help save his life. Then when the issue abated somewhat I got sick. The Doctors think that I was under an extreme amount of stress for way too long, and that my body held out as long as it could. I now have Hughes Syndrome, and a few months after I got sick I had a stroke.

    Stress is something that we need to be better acquainted with in our lives. I believe that we need to understand it as adults and take steps to relieve our bodies.
    Nikki recently posted…Social Media Blast! The Power of the Pin!My Profile

    • Reply
      kristine
      June 15 at 12:49 pm

      Nikki, you truly are amazing with how you have handled all the crappy cards life has dealt you. I know our personal thoughts and lives may look a little different than ‘online’, but I KNOW you are a positive and encouraging person in real life just as you are here in the virtual world! Pulling for you all the time Sister! All my love 🙂 ♥

  • Reply
    Brandi Clevinger
    June 14 at 7:39 am

    I didn’t realize the different levels of stress. It’s all connected to fibromyalgia, in my opinion, but as stated some are unavoidable, and can be handled in a positive way. Great video, too!
    Brandi Clevinger recently posted…25 Successful Ways to Have a Career with a Chronic IllnesMy Profile

    • Reply
      kristine
      June 15 at 12:43 pm

      True! Stress is so damaging in countless ways. Thank you Brandi ♥

  • Reply
    mickey
    July 16 at 8:16 am

    How about living with someone who suffers from PTSD and alcoholism ? I’m thinking this is how I developed fibro. My childhood was amazing with two of the most wonderful parents.

    • Reply
      kristine
      July 16 at 11:03 am

      So sorry Mickey, yep, the emotional stress and it’s physical toll must be tremendous.

  • Reply
    Wendy
    October 5 at 6:27 pm

    I have complex PTSD, which essentially means my life has consisted of prolonged toxic stress for years. I have faithfully engaged in therapy for years, and it didn’t stop me from developing fibromyalgia. The stigma for both diagnosis is high. The ‘psychiatric’ community needs to evolve from dinosaur treatments to modern times and recognize the physiological toll on the body, and treat it accordingly. Therapy never treated the rampant permanently elevated levels of adrenaline and other stress hormones.

    • Reply
      kristine
      October 5 at 9:50 pm

      Thank you for this Wendy. You are so right. The mind and the body are unbelievably complex, and work together for good or bad. It amazes me how often the medical community and psychiatric communitiy will act almost as if one has nothing to do with the other. All my deepest wishes for your continued health ♥♥♥

      • Reply
        Barbara Robinson
        January 1 at 5:49 pm

        Exactly. The treatment needs to address the hormones. That is where we will find the cure!

        • Reply
          kristine
          January 2 at 10:26 am

          Body chemistry will probably play a huge part in finding an effective treatment and cure. Thank you Barbara!

    • Reply
      mickey
      October 6 at 6:14 am

      Totally agree Wendy. I did have a wonderful Dr. who said I had used up all my adrenaline. He said it is finite and unimpeded stress will deplete it. I can remember before this I suffered from panic attacks and the fight or flight syndrome was almost continuous. He said it had a lot to do with adrenal fatigue. Now if I get stressed there is nothing there and I fall apart. The medical community both mental and physical health need to put their heads together for the betterment of people like us.

  • Reply
    Sheryl
    October 26 at 9:21 pm

    I, too, have complex PTSD from the age of 8 on….I am fairly certain I have Fobri from the the last 5 years of hell

    • Reply
      kristine
      October 26 at 11:52 pm

      It very well could be. Take care Sheryl ♥

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